Did TBS Cancel Their ‘Christmas Story’ Marathon Due to Its Bullying Scene?

The classic 1983 holiday film about the adventures of Ralphie Parker famously contains a confrontation with bully Scut Farkus.

Claim

TBS canceled a planned marathon of "A Christmas Story" due to the film's bullying scene.

Rating

Origin

Ralphie Parker’s confrontation with neighborhood bully Scut Farkus in the classic 1983 holiday film A Christmas Story did not cause the TBS network to cancel their yearly marathon showing of the movie, but a social media rumor caused some viewers to fear that Christmas wouldn’t be the same without it.

The rumor was apparently started by a meme appearing to represent an article from “MomusFeed News,” which was mocked up to resemble the style of the digital publication BuzzFeed News:

We confirmed with a TBS representative that the network would not be canceling their holiday marathon airing of the beloved movie. The rumor appeared to be nothing more than a social media hoax.
In the film, which is set in the 1940s, a grown Ralphie Park narrates his memory of a Christmas from his childhood, which included the antics of his little brother Randy and his parents. A Christmas Story has become an enduring cinematic favorite, likely due to its quirky comedy and memorable scenes, one of the most famous of which depicts Ralphie’s hapless encounter with a beleaguered mall Santa.

Throughout the film, adolescent bully Scut Farkus and his sidekick Grover Dill torment the neighborhood children, which culminates in Ralphie’s tackling him and giving him a bloody nose. In 2016, a now-grown Zack Ward, the actor who portrayed Farkus, gave a lighthearted take on how to “bully proof” a child for the holidays:

Fans of the movie will get to watch Ralphie’s father obsess over his prize fishnet stocking-adorned leg lamp starting at 7 P.M. Central Time on Christmas Eve on TBS. The movie marathon will run throughout Christmas day.

Sources
  • Bell, Amanda.   “How to Watch ‘A Christmas Story.'”
        TV Guide.   19 November 2018.

Dear Reader,

stangertoyota.com has long been engaged in the battle against misinformation, an effort we could not sustain without support from our audience. Producing reliable fact-checking and thorough investigative reporting requires significant resources. We pay writers, editors, web developers, and other staff who work tirelessly to provide you with an invaluable service: evidence-based, contextualized analysis of facts. Help us keep stangertoyota.com strong. Make a direct contribution today. Learn More.

Donate with PayPal